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There is nothing like a newborn baby’s super smooth skin. No doubt, you have plenty on your mind with a newborn, so the good news is the old adage “less is more” applies to caring for your newborn’s skin. Your baby’s immune system is developing, so stay away from products with chemicals, fragrances, and dyes that may be present  in clothing, detergents, and baby products. These things can lead to newborn skin irritation, dryness, chafing, and rashes.

Resist the urge to bathe your baby too frequently. Any more than three times a week will remove the natural oils that protect baby’s skin. That leaves baby’s skin vulnerable, so it reacts to any potential allergen and may trigger a reaction like eczema.

Don’t use baby products in the early months. The immune system is still developing. If you have a family history of skin problems, allergies, or asthma, it’s especially important to protect your baby’s immune system, and protect baby from irritating allergens.

Wash baby’s clothing before it’s worn. Use only baby laundry detergents that are fragrance- and dye-free. Wash baby clothes, bedding, and blankets separately from the family’s laundry.

Always protect your baby from the sun.  Just a few serious sunburns can increase your baby’s risk of skin cancer later in life. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or more.

Dr. Platzer likes Aveeno's products for his daughter, but any sunscreen thoroughly applied will do the trick!

Dr. Platzer likes Aveeno’s products for his daughter, but any sunscreen thoroughly applied will do the trick.

For babies 6 months or older. If your baby is 6 months or older, liberally use sunscreen. Also, avoid exposing your baby to the sun during peak hours — generally 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — and dress your baby in protective clothing, a hat with a brim and sunglasses.

If your baby is younger than 6 months, keep them out of direct sunlight. Protect your baby from sun exposure by dressing him or her in protective clothing, a hat with a brim and sunglasses.

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